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Nasal Irrigation for Babies

Updated: Mar 31

No one enjoys having a stuffed up nose. For babies, congestion can be extremely uncomfortable, leading to crying and one grumpy infant. A stuffed nose can disrupt your little one’s sleep, in turn disrupting everyone in the household’s sleep schedule as well. The good news for parents is that there is a simple method that has been used for centuries to alleviate a backed up nasal passage. Nasal irrigation is a common home remedy for adults and babies alike.


How Does it Work?


Nasal irrigation is one of the best at-home remedies for a stuffed nose. The process is very simple, and you don’t need that many supplies to do it. You will need saline solution and a container to hold it. The safest and most effective approach to nasal irrigation for babies is using a neti pot, but some have claimed that a syringe can work, too. The saline solution is poured into one nostril, and as it travels into the other, it flows through your baby’s nasal cavity and rinses out mucus and allergens. This process also adds moisture to a dry nose and can improve breathing.



Step by Step Nasal Irrigation


Using a neti pot is recommended for nose irrigation for babies. To start off, combine lukewarm distilled water and saline solution in the neti pot. It’s a good idea to do this over a sink to avoid spilling water everywhere. Gently lean your baby forward, tilt their head to the side, and pour the solution into their nostril. Be prepared for the water to come out the other nostril, along with a stream of mucus and icky snot. Nasal irrigation is not the most comfortable process in the world, and your baby may not be too keen on having water poured down their nasal cavity. If you find it is next to impossible to work with the neti pot, it may be time to switch to a syringe.


Importance of Using Distilled Water


Before you run to the tap to fill up the neti pot, you should be aware that it is always recommended to use distilled or sterilized water for nasal irrigation for babies. In rare cases, people have reported getting an infection from using a neti pot for nasal irrigation. Using tap water is not safe for a nasal rinse because it has not been adequately filtered or treated for medical use. In extreme cases, tap water could be host to an amoeba. While the chances of an amoeba being present in your tap water are low, it is better to not take any risks.

Keeping Your Little One Congestion-Free


Stuffy noses are going to happen. Whether we like it or not, they are part of life. For parents noticing their baby is experiencing more congestion than normal, there are a few steps you can take around the house to alleviate symptoms. An air humidifier can help battle dryness in the home, reducing stuffy noses and improving the air quality for everyone in the house. For parents who use nasal irrigation, it is a good idea to keep a trusted source of distilled water in the home. Click here to learn more.

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